TEMPLES


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BUDDHIST TEMPLES IN HAWAII

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ISLAND TEMPLE ADDRESS
Big IslandHakalau Jodo MissionHakalau Point, Hakalau, Hawaii, 96710
Big IslandHamakua Jodo MissionHonokaa Point, Hawaii 96727
Big IslandHawi Jodo Mission55-1104 Akoni Pule Hwy., Hawi, HI 96719
Big IslandHilo Higashi Hongwanji Mission216 Mohouli St., Hilo, HI 96720
Big IslandHilo Hooganji Shingon Mission457 Manono St., Hilo, Hawaii, 96720
Big IslandHilo Meishoin Jodo Mission97 Olona street, Hilo, Hawaii 96720
Big IslandHilo Nichiren Mission24 Makalika Street, Hilo, HI 96720-5836
Big IslandHilo Piihonua Shingon Mission
Big IslandHilo Taishoji Soto Mission278 Kinoole St., Hilo, HI 96720
Big IslandHolualoa Hongwanji Mission
Big IslandHolualoa Shingon Mission
Big IslandHonaunau Hongwanji Branch Temple
Big IslandHonaunau Shingon Mission
Big IslandHonohina Hongwanji Mission32-896 Mamalahoa Hwy., Ninole, HI 96773
Big IslandHonokaa Hongwanji Mission45-5016 Plumeria Street, Honokaa, HI 96727
Big IslandHonokaa Kompukuji Shingon Mission
Big IslandHonomu Henjyoji Mission28-1668 Govt Main Rd., Honomu, HI 96728
Big IslandHonomu Hongwanji Mission28-1658 Govt Main Rd., Honomu, HI 96728
Big IslandHonpa Hongwanji Hilo Betsuin398 Kilauea Ave., Hilo, HI 96720
Big IslandHonuapo Shingon Mission
Big IslandHookena Hongwanji Branch Temple
Big IslandKaiwiki Homyoji Shingon Mission
Big IslandKamuela Hongwanji Mission65-1110 Mamalahoa Hwy., Kamuela, HI 96743
Big IslandKapaau Koboji Shingon Mission
Big IslandKapapala Nichiren Mission
Big IslandKealakekua Honalo Shingon Mission
Big IslandKeei Hongwanji Branch Temple
Big IslandKohala Hongwanji Mission53-4300 Akoni Pule Hwy., Kapaau, HI 96755
Big IslandKohala Jodo MissionKapaau Point, HI 96755-0092
Big IslandKohala Koboji Shingon Mission
Big IslandKona Daifukuji Soto Mission79-7241 Mamalahoa Hwy., Kealakekua, HI 96750
Big IslandKona Hongwanji Mission81-6630 Mamalahoa Hwy., Kealakekua 96750
Big IslandKona Seiganji Shingon Mission
Big IslandKonawaena Shingon Mission
Big IslandKukuihaele Shingon Mission
Big IslandKurtistown Jodo MissionIwasaki Camp Road,Kurtistown, HI 96760
Big IslandLaupahoehoe Jodo Mission
Big IslandMakii Hongwanji Mission
Big IslandNaalehu Higashi Hongwanji Mission
Big IslandNaalehu Hongwanji Mission95-5695 Mamalahoa Hwy., Naalehu, HI 96772
Big IslandNaalehu Shingon Mission
Big IslandNapoopoo Shingon Mission
Big IslandNinole Hongwanji Mission
Big IslandNinole Waikamalu Shingon Mission
Big IslandNiulii Hongwanji Mission
Big IslandOokala Jodo Mission
Big IslandPaauhau Hongwanji Branch Temple
Big IslandPaauilo Hongwanji Mission43-1477 Hauola Rd., Paauilo, HI 96776
Big IslandPaauilo Kongoji Shingon Mission43-1461 Hauola Rd., Paauilo, HI 96776
Big IslandPahala Hongwanji MissionPahala, HI, 96777, US
Big IslandPahala Shingon Mission
Big IslandPapaaloa Hongwanji Mission35-2026 Old Mamalahoa Hwy., Papaaloa, HI 96780
Big IslandPapaikou Hongwanji MissionOld Mamalahoa Hwy., Papaikou, HI 96781-0020
Big IslandPipomau Shingon Mission
Big IslandPuna Hongwanji MissionOld Volcano Rd., Keaau-Mountain View, HI 96749
Big IslandSmith-Maunakea Hongwanji Branch Temple
Big IslandWaikamalu Hongwanji Mission
Big IslandWaimea (Big Island) Shingon Mission
Big IslandWainaku Jodo Mission418 Wainaku Avenue, Hilo, Hawaii 96720
KauaiHanalei Shingon Mission
KauaiHanapepe Hongwanji Mission1-3860 Kaumualii Hwy., Hanapepe, HI 96716
KauaiKapaa Hongwanji Mission4-1170 Kuhio Hwy., Kapaa, HI 96746
KauaiKapaa Jodo Mission4524 Hauaala Road, Kapaa, HI 96746-1809
KauaiKauai Soto Zen Temple Zenshuji3500 Kaumualii Highway, Hanapepe, HI 96716
KauaiKealia Hongwanji Mission
KauaiKekaha Hongwanji Branch Temple
KauaiKilauea Hongwanji Mission
KauaiKoloa Hongwanji MissionKoloa Rd., Koloa, HI 96756
KauaiKoloa Jodo Mission3480 Waikomo Rd., Koloa, HI 96756
KauaiKoloa Shingon Mission
KauaiLawai Shingon Mission3381 Wawae Rd., Kalaheo 96741
KauaiLihue Hongwanji MissionLihue, HI 96766
KauaiMakaweli Higashi Hongwanji Mission
KauaiWaimea Higashi Hongwanji Mission95-54 D Kaumualii Hwy., Waimea, HI 96796
KauaiWaimea Hongwanji Mission
KauaiWaimea Shingon Mission3770 Pule Road # A, Waimea, HI 96796
KauaiWest Kauai Hongwanji Mission4675 Menehune Road, Waimea, HI 96796
LanaiLanai Hongwanji Mission1364 Fraser Ave., Lanai, HI 96763
LanaiLanai Shingon Mission
MauiHamakuapoko Hongwanji Branch Temple
MauiHamakuapoko Shingon Mission
MauiHana Hongwanji Mission
MauiKaanapali Hongwanji Branch Temple
MauiKahului Hongwanji Mission291 South Puunene Ave., Kahului, HI 96732-2426
MauiKahului Jodo Mission325 Laau St., Kahului, HI 96732
MauiKula Hongwanji Branch Temple
MauiKula Shofukuji Shingon Mission113 Puanani Pl., Kula, HI 96790
MauiLahaina Hongwanji Mission551 Wainee St., Lahaina, HI 96761-1109
MauiLahaina Jodo Mission12 Ala Moana St., Lahaina, HI 96761
MauiLahaina Shingon Mission682 Luakini St., Lahaina, HI 96761
MauiMakawao Hongwanji Mission1074 Makakwao Ave., Makawao, HI 96768
MauiMakawao Shingon Mission
MauiMaui Kyoseikaido
MauiOlowalu Hongwanji Branch Temple
MauiPaia Mantokuji Soto Mission253 Hana Hwy., Paia, HI 96799
MauiPaia Rinzai Zen Mission120 Alawai Road, Paia, HI 96779
MauiPaia Shingon Mission
MauiPauwela Hongwanji Mission
MauiPuunene Hongwanji Mission
MauiPuunene Jodo Mission
MauiPuunene Nichiren Mission9 Ani St., Kahului, HI 96732-2857
MauiWailuku Hongwanji Mission1828 Vineyard St., Wailuku, HI 96793
MauiWailuku Jodo Mission67 Central Ave., Wailuku, HI 96793
MauiWailuku Komyoji Shingon Mission1939 North St., Wailuku, HI 96793
MolokaiKalaupapa Soto Mission
MolokaiMolokai Guzeiji Soto Mission90 Hotel Ln., Kaunakakai, HI 96748
OahuAiea Hongwanji Mission99-186 Puakala St., Aiea, HI 96701
OahuDainichido Shingon Mission927 6th Ave., Honolulu, HI 96816
OahuEwa Hongwanji Mission91-1133 Renton Rd., Ewa Beach, HI 96706
OahuEwa Jodo Mission
OahuEwa Sotoshuji Soto Mission1137 Hulili St., Ewa 96706
OahuHalawa Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuHaleiwa Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuHaleiwa Jodo Mission66-279 Haleiwa Rd., Haleiwa, HI 96712
OahuHaleiwa Shingon Mission66-469 Paaloa Rd., Haleiwa, HI 96712
OahuHigashi Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii1685 Alaneo Street, Honolulu, H 96822
OahuHonolulu Myohoji Nichiren Mission2003 Nuuanu Ave., Honolulu, HI96817
OahuHonpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii Betsuin1727 Pali Hwy., Honolulu, HI 96813
OahuJikoen Hongwanji Buddhist Temple1731 N. School St., Honolulu, HI 96819
OahuJodo Mission of Hawaii1429 Makiki St., Honolulu, Hawaii 96814
OahuKahuku Hongwanji Mission
OahuKailua Hongwanji Mission30-D Maluniu Ave., Kailua, HI 96734
OahuKaimuki Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuKakaako Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuKalihi Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuKaneohe Higashi Hongwanji Mission45-520 Keaahala, Kaneohe, HI 96744
OahuKawailoa Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuKawailoa Soto Mission
OahuKoboji Shingon Mission1223 N. School St., Honolulu, HI 96817
OahuLiliha Shingon Mission1710 Liliha St., Honolulu, HI 96817
OahuMakiki Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuManoa Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuMcCully Higashi Hongwanji Mission2132 Fern St., Honolulu, HI 96826
OahuMcCully Shingon Mission1936 Citron St., Honolulu, HI 96814
OahuMcKinerny Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuMililani Hongwanji Mission95-257 Kaloapau St., Mililani, HI 96789
OahuMoanalua Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuMoiliili Hongwanji Mission902 University Ave., Honolulu, HI 96826-3273
OahuNichiren Mission of Hawaii33 Pulelehua St., Honolulu, HI 96817
OahuPalama Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuPalolo Higashi Hongwanji Mission1641 Palolo Ave., Honolulu, HI 96816
OahuPalolo Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuPawaa Hongwanji Branch Tmple
OahuPawaa Kongoji Shingon Mission
OahuPearl City Hongwanji Mission858 2nd St., Pearl City, HI 96782
OahuPuuloa Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuRiver Street Shingon Mission
OahuShingon Shu Hawaii915 Sheridan St., Honolulu, HI 96817
OahuShinshu Kyokai Mission of Hawaii1631 South Beretania, Honolulu, HI 98614
OahuSoto Mission of Aiea-Taiheiji99-045 Kauhale St., Aiea, HI 96701
OahuSoto Mission of Hawaii Shoboji1708 Nuuanu Ave., HI 96817-3292
OahuTantalus Satellite Temple
OahuWahiawa Hongwanji Mission1067 California Ave., Wahiawa, HI 96786
OahuWahiawa Nichiren Mission2112 -B Puu Pl., Wahiawa, HI 96786
OahuWahiawa Ryusenji Soto Mission164 California Ave., Wahiawa, HI 96786
OahuWaiahole Tomonji Soto Mission
OahuWaialae Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuWaialua Hongwanji Mission67-313 Kealohanui St., Waialua, HI 96791
OahuWaialua Shingon Mission
OahuWaianae Hongwanji Mission85-762 Old Government Rd., Waianae, HI 96792
OahuWaikiki Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuWaikiki Shingon Mission
OahuWaimalu Hongwanji Branch Temple
OahuWaimanalo Hongwanji Mission
OahuWaipahu Hongwanji Mission94-821 Kuhaulua St., Waipahu, HI 96797
OahuWaipahu Soto Zen Temple Taiyoji94-413 Waipahu Rd., Waipahu, HI 96797
OahuWatertown Hongwanji Branch Temple

BUDDHISM IN HAWAII

Japanese immigration to Hawaii that began in 1868 marked the beginnings of large-scale settlement and, with it, the establishment of a strong religious base of Buddhism.  Seven Buddhist sects which came to Hawaii in the late 1800s and early 1900s to fill the needs of the early Japanese: Jodo Shin-shu Honpa Hongwanji Sect, Jodo Sect, Shingon Sect, Nichiren Sect, Jodo Shin Sect, and the Higashi Hongwanji Sect.  Beginning with the first temple built in Hilo by Honpa Hongwanji Reverend Soryu Kagahi in 1889, temple establishment was a central community event of the Japanese laborers in Hawaii.  The temple took on significant meaning for the new settlers and exemplified their efforts to carve out their identity and gain acceptance in Hawaii’s multi-cultural society.  Over the past 120 years, the Japanese community established 174 temple sites and through the process of building and rebuilding, constructed nearly 300 Buddhist temples throughout the islands.  Over the various stages of settlement in Hawaii and the ever-changing social conditions of the Japanese society, five distinctive temple styles were born: the Plantation House Style, the Japanese Design Style, the Hawaii Eclectic Style, the Western Influence Design Style, and the Contemporary Style.  These Buddhist temples, as centers of worship, education, and community events, set the cultural, social, economic, and spiritual framework that shaped the heart and mind of the Japanese newcomer.  Buddhist temples were largely neglected since the architectural community, as well as the Japanese community, did not consider them significant architectural artifacts.  Many of the temple structures have lost their original form to additions, poorly executed repairs, or a lack of regular maintenance.  Exacerbating the problem is the fact that the temples are scattered amongst the landscape and often indistinguishable from surrounding buildings, and as a result, few people are even aware of their existence.

HIGASHI HONGWANJI MISSION
In 1901, the Higashi Hongwanji Mission established its first temple in Hawaii on the island of Kauai.  In 1916, a headquarters was created in Honolulu under Rev. Shinkyo Doi.  Higashi Hongwanji Mission is an affiliate of one of the oldest and largest sects in Japan, Shin Buddhism, or as it is officially known, Higashi (East) Jodo Shin Shu.  The Higashi Hongwanji Mission went on to establish temples in Waimea, Hilo, Honolulu, Kaneohe, McCully, and Palolo, most of which are still active with the exception of McCully.

HONGWANJI MISSION
The first Hongwanji Mission was established in 1889 under Rev. Soryu Kagahi.  Situated in Hilo, and sanctioned by Honpa Hongwanji, the temple became a source of pride and community identity as many Japanese laborers volunteered their time for construction.  The Hongwanji Mission follows Nishi (West) Jodo Shin Shu.  Rev. Yemyo Imamura was instrumental in establishing temples throughout the islands.  Rev. Imamura mediated talks during a 1904 strike at the Waipahu Plantation and is credited with reaching a quick resolution.  His successful intervention made other plantation owners eager to provide land and building assistance for new Hongwanji temples.  Hongwanji in Hawaii often integrated themselves in the community through Americanization, especially after World War II.  Congregations sat in Christian church-like pews and many traditional hymns were converted into English.  Temple architecture changed as well.  New structures incorporated Indian influence rather than typical Japanese temple characteristics.  Hongwanji not only serve as sites of worship but also provide educational opportunities, cultural festivities, and community events.  Honpa Hongwanji Mission has grown to become the largest sect of Buddhism in Hawaii.

NICHIREN BUDDHISM
Nichiren Buddhism can be traced back to 1899 and the arrival of Rev. Gyoun Takagi.  In 1902, he established the first Nichiren Shu temple in Kapapala, Kau District, Big Island.  At that time, Nichiren was the fourth Buddhist sect to propagate in Hawaii.  In 1912, Rev. Takagi traveled to Honolulu and established a temporary temple that would evolve into the Nichiren Mission of Hawaii when it moved to Nuuanu.  In 1929, Rev. Benko Sueto created a Japanese language school noting that only the Nichiren Mission did not integrate educational functions and its inclusion should help attract new members.  The Nichiren Mission would eventually establish branches in Puunene, Wahiawa, Hilo, and Honolulu.

SHINGON BUDDHISM
Shingon Buddhism in Hawaii can be traced back to 1885 at the start of Japanese immigration as they arrived to work on the plantations.  In the early 1900s, numerous daishidos were established by followers of Kobo Daishi.  With no hospitals or medical practitioners, the Japanese community often turned to the daishidos for healing and treatment.  The Honzan (main temple) in Japan realized the need for an ordained priest to facilitate the spread of Shingon Buddhism.  In 1902, Rev. Hogen Yujiri established the first official temple in Lahaina.  Soon thereafter, 11 more temples were formed.  By 1941, there were 51 temples spread across Hawaii.  In 1997, Shingon Shu Hawaii Betsuin separated from the Honzan to become an independent entity.  Thus, the School Street (Koyasan) temple became the new headquarters for the remaining 13 Shingon temples in operation.

SOTOSHU BUDDHISM
Sotoshu Buddhism came to Hawaii in 1903 with the arrival of Rev. Senei Kawahara and Rev. Ryoun Kan.  Rev. Kawahara began ministering to the Waipahu Plantation Camp and Rev. Kan established a temple in Wahiawa, Kauai.  In 1904, Rev. Ryuki Hirai ministered in Kawailoa, Oahu, and Rev. Sokyo Ueoka founded the Mantokuji temple in Paia, Maui.  These four locations served as the basis for Sotshu’s development in Hawaii.  A temporary Betsuin (headquarters) as established in 1913 by Rev. Hosen Isobe.  In 1921, during a visit to Hawaii, Archbishop Sekizen Arai officially recognized the Sotoshu Betsuin of Hawaii.  Four more temples were added during the Taisho period (1912 - 1926), and three more during the Showa period (1926 - 1989).  The addition of these temples made Hawaii the largest Sotoshu presence outside of Japan.